Keyword Placement

Meta Title – First to be indexed
H3 – always 3rd
Body Text
URL
H2
H1
H4 second factor to be indexed

H1 to H4
Meta Title
Meta Description – Never index
Meta Keyword – Never index
Body Text – Never index
Image Alt – Never index
anchor link
url
bold
italic

Special Tools

http://www.fakenamegenerator.com/gen-male-us-us.php
http://camelcamelcamel.com/
https://www.guerrillamail.com/

https://www.merchantwords.com/

Notes on Public Domain

http://www.copyright.gov/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_films_in_the_public_domain_in_the_United_States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Public_domain_image_resources

http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/cce/
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/
http://www.postcard.org/publicdomain.htm
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/lists.html

How To Tell If A Magazine Is In The Public Domain


http://www.kingkong.demon.co.uk/ccer/ccer.htm
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1951r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1952r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1953r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1954r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1966r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1967r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1968r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1969r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1970r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1971r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1972r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1973r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1974r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1975r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1976r.html
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/cce/1977r.html

http://homepages.law.asu.edu/~dkarjala/OpposingCopyrightExtension/publicdomain/PDlist.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Images_of_Arizona
http://plicmapcenter.org/
https://www.pima.edu/current-students/library/public-domain-graphics.html
http://homepages.law.asu.edu/~dkarjala/OpposingCopyrightExtension/publicdomain/SearchC-R.html
http://www.publicdomainsherpa.com/public-domain-maps-resources.html

New School Software

Menlo Innovations uses Google AdWords to acquire customers while achieving 22 times its return on investment.
In May 2003, Forbes magazine featured a story about Rich Sheridan, an IT executive who traded unemployment for entrepreneurship after the dotcom bubble burst. With more than 20 years in the IT world, Rich championed a fresh new methodology and development model designed to improve software projects. Along with his co-founders, Rich started Menlo Innovations, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, as the vehicle for that model. But though he knew he had uncovered a business niche in his hometown, he was unsure how to market it.
While the Forbes story generated great press and potential leads for his new business, Rich realized that his marketing methods weren’t attracting as many customers as he’d hoped. He wanted to highlight the company’s “extreme programming” and “High-tech Anthropology®” approach to software design and development and help explain the business to potential customers.
Midwest, midworld
In 2002, after experimenting with several different marketing activities, including media and industry outreach, as well as educational and community events, Rich discovered and decided to try Google AdWords™, an auction-based, online advertising program that enables businesses to advertise on Google and its network of partner websites.
After signing up for an account, Rich built out the keyword lists that would form the core of his campaigns. He chose keywords – words and phrases related to his business – that would trigger his ads. Then he developed ads that clearly communicated the value of Menlo’s offerings.
Six years later, with AdWords as its primary Internet marketing program, Menlo is acquiring customers both domestically and internationally, while getting roughly 22 times its return on investment (ROI).
“Our primary use of AdWords is for marketing and awareness,” says Rich. “AdWords has helped us land deals outside of our Midwest business area, in places that no other campaign could have reached.”
In six years, the company has spent roughly $45,000 on AdWords campaigns. “I can easily trace $1,000,000 of revenue directly to AdWords,” Rich says, “but I’m guessing that two to three times that number could be traced indirectly to people who heard about us using AdWords and then told friends and family, who, in turn, gave us business.”
Measurability mission
In addition to the revenue that AdWords has helped generate, Rich values the
GOOGLE ADWORDS SUCCESS PROFILE
© 2008 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are trademarks of Google Inc.
All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are associated.
What they needed
To get their business up and running{{
To grow their customer base{{
To hone their marketing messages{{
To measure the return on their {{advertising investment
What they did
Started with {{Google AdWords in 2002
Tested different features and ad formats {{to best match their advertising goals
Used clickthrough rates and conversion {{tracking to measure impact and improve campaigns
What they accomplished
Strong ROI: {{Achieved 22 times return on investment with AdWords; $45K AdWords investment delivered more than $1M in revenue
New customers: {{Acquired customers across the country and internationally
“With AdWords, we now have a constant source of new traffic and customers, and we don’t have to rely on clever slogans.” Rich Sheridan, CEO and co-founder, Menlo Innovations
© 2008 Google Inc. All rights reserved. Google and the Google logo are trademarks of Google Inc.
All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are associated.
program’s measurability and transparency. “The beautiful thing about AdWords compared to traditional marketing and advertising is its measurability,” he explains. “You can test messages quickly and frequently, compare the relative results and then embark on a mission of improvement based on real results.”
To measure the precise impact of their campaigns, Rich uses the AdWords Report Center to track clickthrough rates (CTR) and conversions for Menlo’s keywords and ads. The CTR is the number of clicks an ad receives divided by the number of times the ad is shown in Google Web Search results.
He also uses the free conversion tracking tool to see how many of the site’s visitors register or take a solicited action on the Menlo website. “By adding some simple codes to our website, Google automatically tracks these conversions and makes measurement simple and effortless. We can see what ads people click the most and if they convert when they get to our site,” Rich says. “Then, if necessary, we can change our keywords to improve the campaigns. These tracking features have been tremendously helpful.”
Self reliant
As Menlo continues to develop and promote software solutions, Rich expects AdWords to fuel the company’s growth and expand its customer base.
“The world of marketing and advertising is fundamentally different than ten years ago,” Rich says. “We know what’s on peoples’ minds when it’s on their minds, because they search for it online. With AdWords, we now have a constant source of new traffic and customers, and we don’t have to rely on clever slogans.”
GOOGLE ADWORDS SUCCESS PROFILE
About Google AdWords
Google AdWords™ is a performance-based advertising program that enables businesses large and small to advertise on Google and its network of partner web sites. Hundreds of thousands of businesses worldwide use AdWords for text, image, and video ads priced on a cost-per-click (CPC) and cost-per-impression (CPM) basis. Built on an auction-based system, AdWords is a highly quantifiable and cost-effective way to reach potential customers.
For more information, visit
http://www.google.com/adwords

Dogs allowed

Dogs allowed
“I’ve always been crazy about animals,” Suzanne Golter explains amid a chorus
of enthusiastic barking – the soundtrack to a typical day at Happy Hound. “I grew
up with two horses, a cow, a goat, five dogs, and a bunch of cats. And it was my
job to take care of them.” After 20 years in sales and marketing, Suzanne finally
got the chance to return to her roots. She points to the dozing Dalmatian curled
up at her feet. “Rennie absolutely loved her drop-in doggy daycare back in Los
Angeles,” Suzanne recalls, “but when we moved up to the Bay Area eight years
ago, I couldn’t find that same type of positive environment. So I thought, ‘Hey,
maybe there’s a business opportunity here.’”
In March 2004, Suzanne rented out a warehouse in Oakland and opened Happy
Hound, a boutique-style daycare and boarding facility for canines of all shapes
and sizes. “My mission is to ensure the happiness, comfort, and health of each
and every client – both dogs and humans,” she says. “I decided to use a stateof-
the-art ventilation system, environmentally-friendly cleaning products, and a
webcam so people can keep tabs on their pals throughout the day.”
Fetching clients
“Those first few days, it was just me and my two dogs in a huge warehouse,”
Suzanne remembers. “They needed new playmates and I needed some business.”
So she turned to the Internet to reach her market: working professionals who want
nothing but the best for their loyal companions. “I knew that my target clients don’t
open the Yellow Pages – they go on the Web. Because that’s what I would do.”
Suzanne signed up with Google AdWords™ shortly after kickoff. “Right here at my
desk, I set up my primary means of advertising in one sitting,” she says. “As the
founder of a new local business, I had to wear a lot of hats. AdWords let me do
my marketing all by myself.” Rennie the Dalmatian gives her a wounded look. “Of
course, how could I forget – my dogs came up with most of the ads and keywords.”
“At first, I set my geographic targeting options so my ads showed as far as
Sacramento,” Suzanne continues. “I got so many calls I didn’t know what to do!
Woman’s Best Friend
Dog daycare and boarding facility Happy Hound gets 90%
of its business through Google AdWords.
What they did
 Started with Google AdWords in
2004
 Set up a campaign for each service
 Fine-tuned geographic targeting
options to reach a local audience
 Tracked leads through client
applications
What they needed
 To get a new business off the ground
 To grow their customer base
 To target customers in their local
market
What they accomplished
 Grew business: Are now at maximum
capacity for daycare and boarding
 Solid customer base: Cater to loyal
group of local clients
 Consistent leads: Acquire 40 new
clients a month through Google
AdWords
 New horizons: Plan to expand
geographically
Who they are
 Happy Hound Play & Daycare
 www.happyhound.com
 Oakland, California
 33 employees
 Boutique-style daycare and boarding
for dogs
“On average, we get 40
new clients a month
through AdWords,
along with almost as
many applicants we
can’t accept right
away. Overall, AdWords
generates 90 percent
of our business.”
Suzanne Golter, founder,
Happy Hound
© Photo copyright Lori A. Cheung, thePetPhotographer.com, used with permission.
© Copyright 2007. Google is a trademark of Google Inc.
All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are associated.
GOOGLE ADWORDS SUCCESS PROFILE
So I scaled back and focused my resources on the Oakland-San Jose area. I like
that fl exibility. When I expand, I’ll just broaden the region I target with AdWords.”
Best in show
Since launching Happy Hound, Suzanne has tried out other advertising methods,
but Google AdWords has stood the test of time. “I’ve tried running print ads in
dog-related magazines with national circulation,” she says. “They were expensive
and ineffi cient, especially for a local business like Happy Hound. AdWords has
been my most effective means of advertising since the beginning – which is why it
gets 90 percent of my advertising budget. And it even works nicely with our other
main source of business: word-of-mouth. People tell their friends about Happy
Hound, they go and type it into Google, and our ad comes up.”
“Given the nature of my business, it’s very easy to track exactly where my leads
are coming from,” Suzanne continues. “Prospective clients are required to fi ll out
an application with a question about how they found us. On average, we get 40
new clients a month through AdWords, along with almost as many applicants we
can’t accept right away. Overall, AdWords generates 90 percent of our business.”
Groomed for success
Today, Happy Hound rarely has vacancy. Its 33 employees provide care,
supervision, exercise, and fun to roughly 120 dogs per day and 30 per night.
Suzanne plans to open new locations based on the same conviction: dogs and
people alike deserve convenient and customized services that accommodate their
lifestyles. “That philosophy – along with Google AdWords – has put us ahead of
the pack.”
About Google AdWords
Google AdWords™ is a performancebased
advertising program that enables
businesses large and small to advertise
on Google and its network of partner
websites. Hundreds of thousands of
businesses worldwide use AdWords for
text, image, and video ads priced on
a cost-per-click (CPC) and cost-perimpression
(CPM) basis. Built on an
auction-based system, AdWords is a
highly quantifi able and cost-effective
way to reach potential customers.
For more information, visit
http://adwords.google.com